New Order versus OMD

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Taking a page from my time in DC, I recently suggested that the monthly DJ gig with friends Jen and Genevieve expand to try a ‘versus night’, specifically New Order versus OMD, as both the latter and Peter Hook, former bassist of the former, were due in town in the coming months.

I was curious if the blissful, insane fun I had at Cure vs. The Smiths, New Order vs. Duran Duran and Depeche Mode nights at DC’s Black Cat (special nod to DJ Michelle Guided for providing much of that soundtrack) could be replicated – on a much smaller scale. And hey, if nobody showed, at least we’d enjoy a night of great music.

We sold the idea to a skeptical manager at The Independent Bar that hosts our low-key, all vinyl gigs. Now for a poster design.


The Design

It starts and ends with Peter Saville. Saville’s design defined an era. His work with Factory Records, his iconic cover designs for Joy Division, New Order, OMD and other post-punk bands emerging from the UK in the late 70s and early 80s are instantly recognizable.

I had a lot of fun playing in his sandbox as I went from producing one design to four. The designs are all mashups. The main poster utilizes the bold lines and streetmap grid look of New Order’s 2016 ‘Music Complete’ album while incorporating the tan, brown and green color scheme from OMD’s 1983 album ‘Dazzle Ships’, both designed by Saville. I added the fuchsia for some pop as I felt it complemented the other colors and contrasted the black line art well.

The typography is strict Helvetica, which lent itself to the utilitarian look of a lot of the early Factory Records and Hacienda materials.

Each of the posters pulls from New Order – OMD – Factory aesthetic and style – all shaped by Saville. Famously, the sparse ‘No’ that featured on New Order’s ‘Waiting For the Siren’s Call’ was actually a response by Saville to a request to design the album cover.

Episode 22 – Ghosthouse Part 2

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Just when you thought it was safe to back into the Ghosthouse…

Our 132-hour expose of this 1988 Italian horror movie continues with Part 2, where Jon, Pete and guest Bernie Gonzalez dial it up a few notches to discuss Willy Moon, world’s creepiest happy-go-lucky hitchhiker, among other details.

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Episode 21 – Ghosthouse Part 1

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Since friend, artist and all-around great guy Bernie Gonzalez told us to watch the bizarro 1988 horror flick Ghosthouse (it has been give then RiffTrax treatment) it’s only fitting we have him on to explain himself. We also get a comprehensive summary of Italian giallo cinema, of which Ghosthouse is a part. When the Italian director uses the nom de plume Humphrey Humbert in the credits, you know something messed up is happening.

Add a little ghost girl, a not really creepy clown doll and some Troll 2-level acting and you have this beautiful disaster. Plus America’s favorite happy-go-lucky hitchhiker, Willy Moon. Ciao!

Episode 20 – The Cloverfield Paradox

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What beats a paradox? A full house. Actually, hell if we know, but that doesn’t stop us from talking about Netflix and J.J. Abrams’ Super Bowl surprise – another entry in the Cloverfield series. By now even your pet guinea pig, Colonel Squeaker has weighed in on this one, but we’ve decided to take a crack, too. Hey, we never said we were timely.


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Episode 19 – Terror Train in Vain

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The golden age of 80s slasher cinema produced some interesting, if not great movies. In this episode, we buy a ticket for Terror Train, a 1980 Canadian-American production that slipped through the cracks of our adolescent viewing. Jamie Lee Curtis, Ellis from Die Hard and David Copperfield playing against type as a – wait for it – magician! It can’t be all bad can it?


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